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2008

The 13 states that have topped the 50 percent mark are Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Massachusetts, Nebraska, Nevada, New York, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Utah, West Virginia and Wisconsin.

Ten members of the Penn State Dairy Science Club recently attended the American Dairy Science Association-American Society of Animal Science annual meetings in Indianapolis. The convention was held July 6-11 and attracted students and professional members from the US, Mexico, Canada, and other areas of the world.

Pasture offers the advantages of space, fresh air, and a confident footing. These things should not be compromised in shelter.

We are coming into the summer months when the incidence of mastitis and the bulk tank somatic cell count tend to rise.

For many producers across the state, it has been a struggle to maintain fat tests above a 3.4%. This has occurred on non-grazing herds and has been fairly consistent throughout the summer, regardless of temperature. This seems to be occurring more on herds feeding a high forage based ration and on an average milk production between 70 and 80 pounds. The one commonality is these herds are feeding corn silage. What are some issues that could be challenging butter fat percent?

The American Dairy Science Association held its annual meeting in Indianapolis, Ind., in July. Here’s a look at some of the latest research into nutrition and management of dairy calves and heifers.

Accounting is probably one of the most misunderstood concepts of our society, yet it affects the lives of virtually every person on a daily basis.

Achieving a high accurate heat detection rate (HDR) is a major challenge to dairy producers.

One of Wisconsin’s leading dairy advocates will return to her Pennsylvania roots to share perspectives on leadership in the industry from a woman’s point of view at the Women in Dairy 2008 conference planned November 20.

Glanders is a bacterial disease of perissodactyls (odd-toe dungulates) with zoonotic potential that has been known since ancient times [14]. The incubation period is from a few days to many months [15]. Glanders is transmissible to humans by direct contact with sick animals or infected materials. In the untreated acute disease, there is 95% mortality within 3 weeks.

Glanders is a bacterial disease of perissodactyls (odd-toe dungulates) with zoonotic potential that has been known since ancient times [14]. The incubation period is from a few days to many months [15]. Glanders is transmissible to humans by direct contact with sick animals or infected materials. In the untreated acute disease, there is 95% mortality within 3 weeks.

Glanders is a bacterial disease of perissodactyls (odd-toe dungulates) with zoonotic potential that has been known since ancient times. The incubation period is from a few days to many months. Glanders is transmissible to humans by direct contact with sick animals or infected materials. In the untreated acute disease, there is 95% mortality within 3 weeks.

Never feed lawn grass clippings or raked leaves from the yard.

Neuropathogenic Equine Herpes Virus -Update ---Animal Health Emergency Management and Information Network, Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Animal Health and Diagnostic Services

Illinois Sen. Barack Obama visits the College of Agricultural Sciences’ dairy complex on March 30.

The Team placed third in sheep and beef selection, and fifth in sheep judging, out of the eleven universities who participated in this three-day event.

Debbie McAllister, a senior in DAS, excelled as high individual overall at the Eastern National Collegiate Livestock judging contest at Timonium.

Richard G. (Dick) Saacke, Professor Emeritus of Reproductive Physiology at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, has been named 2006 Dairy Science Distinguished Alumnus.

Glenn A. Shirk, Landisville, PA has been selected by the Penn State Department of Dairy and Animal Science to receive the 2004 Dairy Science Distinguished Alumnus Award. Shirk, a retired senior extension agent, will be honored at the Penn State Dairymen’s Club banquet on Friday, November 12, in State College and at other departmental events that weekend.

The 2008 Pennsylvania 4-H Achievement Days Dairy Cattle Judging Contest took place Wednesday, August 8. Contestants judged Jerseys supplied by Ryan Clark, Tyrone, and Holsteins from the Penn State dairy herd.

The student will participate in a variety of projects on both Windows and Unix/Linux and may treat this as an internship.

High feed-grain prices and the growing interest in "natural" foods have spurred both consumers and farmers to consider grass-fed beef, and a recent study done by Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences researchers may reinforce this trend.

The microchipping of thoroughbreds in the US is set to begin, with the Jockey Club now offering microchips for sale. Microchips are not currently a requirement for thoroughbred registration and participation is voluntary.

Dr. Alex Hristov, Associate Professor of Dairy Nutrition, and Dr. Joy Pate, Professor of Reproductive Physiology and the C. Lee Rumberger and Family Endowed Chair in Agricultural Sciences